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chariot festival parade

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One of Vancouver’s well-known stilt-walkers rests after taking part in the Hare Krishna parade en route to the 37th annual Chariot Festival in Stanley Park today.

, originally uploaded by inklake.

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Velut arbor aevo

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Velut arbor aevo, originally uploaded by inklake.

May the tree thrive. Corner of Terminal and Main. This tree has appeared in photographs for over a hundred years.

260 northern st.

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260 NORTHERN ST., originally uploaded by inklake.

Scene at the corner of Northern and Western Streets in Vancouver.

It’s not my fault!

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Classic …

Visit Chris McVeigh’s flickr photostream by clicking on the photo.



It’s not my fault!, originally uploaded by powerpig.

Is Vancouver ready?

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We’ve seen the fuss around the simple addition of a bike lane across the Burrard Bridge. Are we ready for the Olympics? Here is an article from last March that projects some much bigger changes ahead for the city …

Copyright © James Page. Please click on the photograph to view his flickr site.

Olympic organizers, working under the umbrella of the Vancouver Olympic Organizing Committee, have developed a transportation plan for the Games. It foresees a drastic reduction in automobile use by residents of the Lower Mainland.

The projections are ambitious: “Games-time operations will reduce the capacity of the local road network into downtown by 50 per cent from the east and overall into downtown by 20 per cent,” predicts the plan, released this morning.

That reduction in cars is going to happen because some of the city’s major arteries are going to be given over to what’s called Olympic lanes. That essentially means clearing lanes for Olympic vehicles containing officials, VIPs and athletes. Some of the key roads shut to the public are Expo and Pacific Boulevards, the Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts, and Canada Place and Waterfront roads.

So best forget about parking downtown from January 21st to March 21st. In fact, don’t even think about driving downtown unless you absolutely have to. You will probably regret it. Parking will be hell.

One alternative is try and work at home, if possible. But the option most people face is taking public transit. That’s what Olympic officials are hoping for.

Read the rest of this entry »

So who’s Bob?

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This is an original Chestnut canoe, named after the designer who crafted one of the world’s first durable “lightweight” canoes.

15-0BobsSpecial In a quirky bit of canoeing lore, it was someone named Bob who designed the boat, so “Bob’s Special” became the model name. But no one seems to know who Bob is so it’s impossible to trace the lineage of this fine craft. All I’ve ever known since childhood is that “Bob’s Special” is one of the fastest solo canoes around.

It was built in 1970 in Fredericton, New Brunswick, and it became one of the most popular canoes the company made. First and foremost it was designed for fishermen and solo-trippers. It’s still a joy to solo in.



ocean, rocks and canoe, originally uploaded by inklake.

Copyright © Kevin Teichroeb.

At the time it was the cutting edge for lightweight canoes, designed to weigh only 50 lbs, measuring 15′ in length and still able to carry upwards of 700 lbs.

Our Bob’s Special moved to Ontario when my father bought it new, and then on to Vancouver when he drove it out here for me to have several years ago. If I stretch the point a bit, I can say that this canoe has been to all three Canadian oceans: the Atlantic, where it was built, the Arctic, where we took it all the way down the Lake Superior watershed to James Bay, and to the Pacific, only minutes from where it sits in our garage now.

It’s a little worse for wear these days, Bob_Special_15but it still raises eyebrows when it’s taken off the roof of the car and set down in the water. The design beauty of a traditional cedar-canvas canoe definitely still holds some attraction on a quiet, early morning paddle along the upper reaches of Indian Arm, BC.

Alexei makes the Tyee

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One of my photos was featured in the Tyee today. “Alexei’s Self-Portrait”. Click on the photo to see it on my flickr page.



Alexei’s self-portrait, originally uploaded by inklake.

When I bumped into him Alexei had just spent the entire afternoon taking portraits of himself with his Leica camera. As you can see, his TyeephotopoolbadgeGIFnewknack for composition while looking into the wrong end of the lens was uncanny.

Said he was writing his autobiography and needed illustrations for it. My first thought was that none of his self-portraits included his trademark cigarette.