video

Discover the Universe at SFU

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Promotional piece I produced for SFU’s Faculty of Science. Music by Dan Moxon of Bend Sinister, motion graphics by Matt Schilling, The Little Motion Company.

SFU Faculty of Science builds a state-of-the-art public Observatory on the Burnaby campus.

The Sky’s the Limit: SFU announces Trottier Observatory and Studio

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A feature I produced and directed for the SFU Faculty of Science for SFU’s Creative Services. Some phenomenal motion graphics and drone helicopter footage went into the making of this short.

SFU has unveiled its plan for a $4.4 million facility on its Burnaby campus dedicated to engaging children and youth in science.

Flashmob at YVR powered by Arts Umbrella

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My daughter’s dance company at Arts Umbrella (here in Vancouver) staged a flashmob at YVR last weekend. Here HuffPo has picked up the story. They were on Good Morning America on Monday …

 

Freeriding

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Take a look at this freeriding video produced for network television a few years ago.  Just dug it out of the archives.  I had the good fortune to work with Jay Hoots and several other experts and coaches to create this feature about injuries and how to avoid them.  One of the most spectacular and dangerous sports around.  Some really accomplished riders in this piece.

Vancouver Opera gives Lillian Alling world premiere

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If you’re thinking about heading out for a walk this weekend, you’re probably planning on a few hours, tops – and likely on pavement, or at very least a well-worn path.

But when Russian émigré Lillian Alling went for a walk in the 1920s, she strode clear across North America – through dense bush and over steep mountain passes – with nothing but the clothes on her back and an iron pipe for protection on her way from New York to British Columbia, then north to the Yukon.

Complete article here.

Stunning commitment to original work from the Vancouver Opera.  Here is another example of their innovation.

UBC E-BEETLE FIRST ELECTRIC CAR TO CROSS CANADA

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History made in an E-Beetle.

This is an amazing accomplishment!  6,400 km in 16 days, showing the durability of electric-powered cars.  If you want to follow their whole journey in retrospect, here’s the UBC Electric Car Club’s E-Beetle blog.  And here’s their video:

From their site:

At 6:00 PM AST, the UBC Electric Car Club’s E-Beetle arrives at ALDERNY LANDING, DARTMOUTH NS and is the first-ever electric car  to complete a coast to coast voyage across Canada. Starting on August 21st, 2010, the E- Beetle has covered 6400 kilometers in 16 days (2 days break in Quebec

waiting for Hurricane Earl to pass) without any support vehicles, using only existing infrastructure.

The E-Beetle’s voyage has been featured on Wired.com, CTV, CBC, and in print media across Canada. The public is able to track the E-Beetle’s arrival by GPS via the UBCECC website.

The E-Beetle is powered by a Lithium Iron Phosphate battery pack with a capacity of 50 Kilowatt Hours, giving it a range of 300km at 100km/h and 500km at 50km/h with a top speed of 140kmh. Charging time is approximately 4 hours.

Dancer Ziyian Kwan and others dance their frustration over B.C.’s arts cuts

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For a complete series of photos take a look at Ziyian Kwan’s blog.

By Janet Smith

A veteran Vancouver dancer and her colleagues are taking their frustration over B.C. arts cuts to the streets.

Ziyian Kwan is dubbing her protests “what i am dancing sundays”. She’s organizing impromptu dance/rally/busking sessions in front of the Gene Cafe at Main and Kingsway.

Her next dance-protest is this Sunday (August 15) from 4 to 6 p.m., and she invites other artists angered by the provincial Liberals’ slashing of both gaming and core funding to the cultural sector to join her. So far dancer-choreographers Jennifer ClarkeLee Su-FehJay Hirabayashi, and others have joined her on the sidewalk.

Read the entire article here at the Georgia Straight.

Tour de France 2010 begins

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Yes!  The 2010 Tour de France is underway.  The results of the Prologue time trial are in today and Victoria’s Ryder Hesjedal finished a very respectable 37th.  He’s riding the confidence of a very good 2010 season and has said in recent interviews that he might just win a stage this year.

Here’s the Tour route video for 2010:


From CBC Sports:

Fabian Cancellara of Switzerland won the prologue of the Tour de France on Saturday, with seven-time winner Lance Armstrong finishing an impressive fourth to start what he’s calling his last ride in cycling’s main event.

Cancellara, who has won four Tour prologues including last year’s in Monaco, clocked 10 minutes for the individual time trial on 8.9 kilometres of rain-dampened roads in Rotterdam.

“That was a great opening for me and the team,” Cancellara said, referring to his Danish squad Saxo Bank. “It’s an amazing day. I’m really happy.”

Germany’s Tony Martin, who had led for most of the day, was second, 10 seconds back, and David Millar of Britain placed third — 20 seconds off the pace.

Armstrong trailed 22 seconds back in fourth. Perhaps most impressively, the American edged out rival Alberto Contador — the defending Tour champion and top pre-race favourite — by five seconds.

Ryder Hesjedal of Victoria was 37th, 46 seconds off the pace, while Michael Barry of Toronto was 120th, 1:08 back. The top rider for the Canadian-owned Cervelo TestTeam was Lithuanian Ignatas Konovalovas, who was 33rd, 44 seconds behind the leader.

Read more at CBC Sports

Steve Nash begins journey to the World Cup

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… sorta …

Courtesy of CBS Sports.

Vancouver timelapse

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Phenomenal video.

Sings like the Grinch but he Must Be Santa

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Or is that Shane McGowan of Pogues reknown he’s channeling?

Rollicking good Christmas offering from Bob Dylan.

A Big Festival Born in a Small Town

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banff film festBANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL TOUR TRAVELS TO KALISPELL

Nice video trailer on the Festival tour home page!

The small Alberta town of Banff, where the population is only slightly higher than the elevation, may seem an unlikely candidate to spawn the largest mountain film festival in North America. But if you look closer, at its illustrious Banff Centre of arts and culture, at its stunning mountainous surroundings, perhaps it all makes sense.

From Oct. 31 to Nov. 8, more than 10,000 moviegoers crowded into theaters throughout Banff, a town of just over 8,000 in Alberta, for the famed Banff Mountain Film Festival. From 277 total entries, 62 films were chosen for the festival. Screenings included outdoor adventure films and documentaries serving as in-depth cultural examinations. Winners in various categories were named.

The event is held by the Banff Centre, an institution that film festival director Shannon O’Donaghue describes as a “leading center for professional development for artists” in Canada. Roughly 5,000 artists from across the world train at the center annually, in fields such as mountain culture, aboriginal arts, drama, opera, dance and literary arts, among others. The center is geared toward “mid-career artists,” O’Donaghue said, differing from traditional university art schools.

“We have a lot of residencies and workshops,” O’Donaghue said. “It’s a really special place, actually. There’s nothing like this in another small town in Canada.”

Just days after the festival ended, two vans – equipped with top-of-the-line digital projectors – embarked on a mission to show 25 selected films across Canada and the United States. The films will also be taken to countries across the globe as part of the Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour, which will hold more than 500 screenings in 30 countries, O’Donaghue said.

Outside of Canada, the first stop for the tour is Montana. On Nov. 13, films will be shown in Great Falls, followed by back-to-back screenings in Kalispell at Flathead High School on Nov. 17 and 18 at 7 p.m. As in past years, the Flathead Nordic Ski Patrol is organizing the Kalispell event as a fundraiser for the nonprofit.

Read the entire article here.

BC flickr photographers help speak out against arts cuts

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Recently I had the privilege of producing a PSA with Jenn Strom for the Alliance for Arts and Culture in response to the BC government’s funding cuts to the arts. About a month ago the Vancouver arts community put together a huge rally at the Vancouver Art Gallery. This PSA starts with that event.

Thanks to a big community of flickr photographers and several BC artists (listed below) who contributed their time, images and music to this video. Very special thanks to Jenn for contributing her talent and insight.

Please share it widely and spread the word.

Featured photography: Russ Beinder, Jeremy Crowle, Jurek Durczak, Derek von Essen, Dan Fairchild, Electric Company Theatre, Jonathon Evans, Gale Franey, John Goldsmith, Ivan Grabovac, hundrednorth, Ahmad & Graça Kavousian, Peter Kim, Mark Klotz, Kris Krug, Joao Marcelino, Jenn Perutka, Philip, Tony Puerzer, Philippe Sokazo, Susannah Steers, Peter Suk Sin Chan, Vancouver Opera.

Time Lapse sequence (moving): David Suggitt; Time Lapse sequence (still): Tim Matheson; Video clips of rally: Paul Bennett; Audio clips: Keith Higgins.

Producer: Kevin Teichroeb
Editor: Jenn Strom
Composer: Christian Prohom

If you would like to speak out, follow this link to a webform where you can write in support of BC arts.

“Samsara”

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A strong case for arts funding at the Arts Umbrella rehearsal studios on Granville Island yesterday. This was an afternoon preview of “Samsara”, choreographed by Margo Sappington, music by Tony De Vit, and performed by their Senior Dance Company. All of these dancers are between 16-19.



"Samsara", originally uploaded by inklake.

The video clip was shot on my iPhone.

Great commercial!

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The power of wind.

Pain Contest

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Leaving the dock

I’m especially interested in the article below because I did a feature last summer on the Canadian Men’s Eight and their Erg (ergometer/indoor rowing machine) training called “Pain Contest”.

Here’s the video about the Beijing gold-medal winning crew; below is an article about a sensational Danish rower who has broken the world record on the Erg twice this year …

Erg versus water, that is the question
26/08/2009

The indoor rowing machine, or ergometer, love or loath it, the machine has become a vital training tool for rowers. Today at the 2009 World Rowing Championships in Poznan, Poland, world record holder on the erg, Henrik Stephansen raced on the water. Denamark Lightweight Double

Coming from Denmark, Stephansen is part of a rowing programme that does not always have the luxury of rowing on the water. It is often too cold and sometimes too rough. So Danish Rowing has adapted by training indoors. Earlier this year lightweight athlete Stephansen went under six minutes over 2000m on the indoor rowing machine. His time of 5:58.5 set a World Record that was previously thought unachievable.

Read the entire article here.

Blast! to screen at the Rio on Sept. 18

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“Filmmaker Paul Devlin follows the story of his brother, Mark Devlin PhD, as he leads a tenacious team of scientists hoping to figure out how all the galaxies formed by launching a revolutionary new telescope under a NASA high-altitude balloon.

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Berlino the mascot crashes

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Berlino drops Melaine Walker of Jamaica during a celebratory piggy back ride after she won gold in the women’s 400m hurdles. Owww!

Here’s another clip where Walker is interviewed after the fall. Didn’t seem to upset her too much.

Wariner vs. Merritt: re-match on Friday

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merritt vs warinerLooks like we’re going to see a big re-match on Friday in the men’s 400m between Olympic champion LaShawn Merritt and world champ Jeremy Wariner. Both won their semis today: Merritt in 44.37 and Wariner in 44.69. This is turning into one of the best rivalries in track and field.

Here’s a feature I did on Wariner last summer, before Jeremy lost his Olympic title to Merritt.