olympic

Disappointment

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Real disappointment from the Canadian Alpine Ski team. No one can be more disappointed that Manuel Osborne-Paradis. His Olympics are now over.

Do they have the skiers to redeem themselves in the remaining non-speed events?

Over the past two years, Osborne-Paradis has done his best to downplay the Games, at one point saying he would rather win the overall World Cup skiing title than an Olympic gold. In the lead-up to Vancouver, countless reporters asked him how he was going to handle the pressure of skiing in front of hometown fans. His answer was always the same: I’ll treat it like every other event. This afternoon, standing in front of reporters yet again—his medal hopes dashed—he was asked whether the pressure finally got to him. After a long pause, he answered this way: “I liked the pressure. I liked the fact that people’s eyes were on me and wanted me to do well, because I think I’ve always done better like that. The expectations push you harder. I liked it. There was a lot of it here, and it was more than we’ve ever had, but I don’t think I succumbed to anything. I think it was just a good opportunity, and it was an opportunity lost.”

Do Canadians have a right to be disappointed, not only in you, but the rest of your teammates? “They have a reason to be disappointed,” he said. “Everybody has a reason to be disappointed. That’s what the expectations were—and that was our expectation, too.”

stroke

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Kyle Hamilton, stroke of the Men’s Olympic Eight. This photo was featured in an ad campaign for Rowing Canada.



stroke, originally uploaded by inklake.

cox

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Brian Price, cox of the Men’s gold medal winning Olympic Eight crew.



cox, originally uploaded by inklake.