Latest Event Updates

Discover the Universe at SFU

Video Posted on Updated on

Promotional piece I produced for SFU’s Faculty of Science. Music by Dan Moxon of Bend Sinister, motion graphics by Matt Schilling, The Little Motion Company.

SFU Faculty of Science builds a state-of-the-art public Observatory on the Burnaby campus.

Murphy Farrell

Image Posted on Updated on

Longtime blues and punk drummer at venues like the Yale and the Smilin’ Buddha. One of our key interviews for thevisiblecity.ca and my personal favourite photo from that project.

Vancouver’s Neon Neighbourhoods

Image Posted on Updated on

ovaltineHaven’t been here in a long time and I thought I’d open up again on the blog to show some of the things I’ve seen and done lately. Almost a year ago now I co-curated an online exhibit with the Virtual Museum of Canada and the Museum of Vancouver about Vancouver’s neon history. The exhibit is called The Visible City and I highly recommend it for the stories and the images, told and captured by some of Vancouver’s finest including Dal Richards, Joe “Sh*thead” Keithley (DOA), Gregory Henriquez (architect of the new Woodwards complex), Mark Brand (Save On Meats), and Bill Pechet (Great White Way on Granville Corridor) .

This post links you to many of the photos I took for the exhibit, which I’ve featured here in my Neon Neighbourhoods set on flickr. Enjoy!

The Sky’s the Limit: SFU announces Trottier Observatory and Studio

Video Posted on Updated on

A feature I produced and directed for the SFU Faculty of Science for SFU’s Creative Services. Some phenomenal motion graphics and drone helicopter footage went into the making of this short.

SFU has unveiled its plan for a $4.4 million facility on its Burnaby campus dedicated to engaging children and youth in science.

“We” back-lit on Sunset Beach

Posted on Updated on

 

, originally uploaded by inklake.

Caught this with my iPhone.  Phenomenal sunset last night behind “We” by Spanish artist Jaume Plensa. Part of the Vancouver Biennale on English Bay above the appropriately named Sunset Beach.

Flashmob at YVR powered by Arts Umbrella

Posted on Updated on

My daughter’s dance company at Arts Umbrella (here in Vancouver) staged a flashmob at YVR last weekend. Here HuffPo has picked up the story. They were on Good Morning America on Monday …

 

the gates

Posted on Updated on


the gates
, originally uploaded by inklake.

Abandoned lift on Grouse Mountain looks more like a sci-fi gate into a new dimension. Covered in heavy frost from all the snow-making equipment.

Vertigo

Posted on Updated on

Ski season is back and the north shore mountains here in Vancouver are beckoning.

Came across this photo online this afternoon. It was taken by Paul Bednar, a ski instructor from the Skischule I taught with in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.  I still remember the rush of fear and adrenalin I got as I looked over this cliff myself years ago.  Believe me, when I did it, I did not hang my ski tips over the cliff face.

Here’s the note he posted with the photo:

There was a t-bar at the top of the Zugspitze (elevation 2962m/9718 ft). Once you got off the lift, you could sidestep up another 50 metres or so to a small break in the rocks that formed the border between Germany and Austria. At that point, you could just stand there with your skis still on and look down the cliff face onto the town of Lermoos, Austria.

In other words, one slip and you’re in Austria, almost 3,000m below.

Note the very old-school Völkl’s.

25th anniversary of the Haida blockade

Posted on Updated on

Excellent article in the Tyee today, looking back at the turn of forestry practices and the return of culture in this province.

We Gathered to Say Haw’aa

Celebrating, 25 years later, the Haida blockade that helped win a crucial fight to save forests.

By Caitlyn Vernon, Today, TheTyee.ca

Think back 25 years. Picture the way forestry used to happen along the coast of British Columbia. I remember driving past clear cuts that stretched from river bottom to mountain top, hillsides looking completely shaved of all life. Massive piles of log debris obstructing streams, preventing salmon from spawning. With increasing speed, the ancient trees that had taken thousands of years to grow were being mowed down for timber and toilet paper.

But not everyone was just standing by. On Meares Island off the west coast of Vancouver Island, the First Nations joined forces with environmentalists to stop logging. And on Haida Gwaii a campaign had been in the works since the early 1970s to protect the southern part of the archipelago. It was called the South Moresby wilderness proposal.

As a kid in the early ’80s I had the poster of Burnaby Narrows on my wall. It seemed this iconic image from South Moresby was everywhere at the time — the bright sea stars and abundance of rich intertidal life illustrating the beauty of the area and raising awareness of the need to protect it from logging.

Read the entire article here.

Freeriding

Posted on Updated on

Take a look at this freeriding video produced for network television a few years ago.  Just dug it out of the archives.  I had the good fortune to work with Jay Hoots and several other experts and coaches to create this feature about injuries and how to avoid them.  One of the most spectacular and dangerous sports around.  Some really accomplished riders in this piece.

Congrats to World Champions Jennerich and Cameron!

Posted on Updated on

Belated congratulations to Lindsay Jennerich and Tracy Cameron on a brilliant row at the World Championships in New Zealand.  We finally got to see the race yesterday on CBC Television.  Amazing determination to fight through brutally difficult course conditions.  The final 100 metres of the race showed the kind of character and stamina this crew has.  Extremely impressive victory.

Tracy Cameron of Shubenacadie, N.S., and Victoria’s Lindsay Jennerich won Canada’s second gold medal at the world rowing championships with a victory in the lightweight women’s double sculls event Friday in New Zealand.

Cameron and Jennerich finished the 2,000-metre course in a time of eight minutes 6.20 seconds. Daniela Reimer and Anja Noske of Germany won silver in 8:07.33 and Christina Giazitzidou and Alexandra Tsiavou of Greece took bronze in 8:09.14.

Canada also won gold Wednesday in the adaptive coxed four.

Also Friday, Jensen of Innerkip, Ont. and Rares Crisan of Mississauga Ont., won bronze in the men’s light pair.

Cameron and Jennerich overcame windy conditions to win Canada’s first world championship gold in the lightweight women’s double sculls since the 1990s.

“We did an excellent job of handling the head- and cross-wind conditions,” Jennerich said.

“We just kept to the race plan — to stay long and keep breathing. … What I thought was really positive was that at 750 (metres) to go we had a lead and we were at a low enough rate, with a good enough rhythm, that I knew if someone was going to challenge us that we would be able to answer.”

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/sports/amateur/story/2010/11/05/sp-rowing.html#ixzz15HoaXdu8

Vancouver Opera gives Lillian Alling world premiere

Posted on Updated on

If you’re thinking about heading out for a walk this weekend, you’re probably planning on a few hours, tops – and likely on pavement, or at very least a well-worn path.

But when Russian émigré Lillian Alling went for a walk in the 1920s, she strode clear across North America – through dense bush and over steep mountain passes – with nothing but the clothes on her back and an iron pipe for protection on her way from New York to British Columbia, then north to the Yukon.

Complete article here.

Stunning commitment to original work from the Vancouver Opera.  Here is another example of their innovation.

Song Dong’s mother lode: Beijing artist turns mom’s hoardings into art

Posted on Updated on

What a sight: The second storey of the Vancouver Art Gallery, usually stark and pristine with priceless works of art, is filled with stuff. It would not be unfair to call the items, spread out on the floor across three large rooms, junk. But these things – pop bottles, cans of Raid, bits of outdoor carpeting, socks – were a treasure to one woman, and as such have travelled to art galleries around the world in a monumental installation called Waste Not.

This installation is the work of Song Dong, a noted Beijing-based conceptual artist. Consisting of more than 10,000 items, as well as the frame of the tiny house where he grew up, Waste Not serves as a memorial to his father, Song Shiping, and a tribute to his mother, Zhao Xiangyuan. There are strong echoes here of both the Cultural Revolution and of China’s new consumer culture. And there’s an environmental message too: Nothing in Zhao’s life was thrown out, or went to waste.

Full article here at the Globe and Mail.

‘Good Morning to the World’ wins 17th Dragons and Tigers Award at VIFF

Posted on Updated on

Japan’s Good Morning to the World has won the Vancouver International Film Festival’s 17th annual Dragons and Tigers Award. The drama by 23-year-old filmmaker Hirohara Satoru edged out seven other films from Vietnam, South Korea, Thailand, China and Singapore to win the award, which is given to young filmmakers from Asia.

Special mentions were given to the features Don’t Be Afraid, Bi!, directed by Phan Dang Di from Vietnam, and Rumination, directed by Xu Ruotao from China.

Good Morning to the World will receive an additional screening on Saturday at 1 p.m. at Pacific Cinematheque. Satoru takes home a $10,000 cash prize along with the award.

Read more here.

John Wood

Posted on Updated on

Usually I wouldn’t be inclined to declare who my childhood heroes were, but in this case I’ll make an exception.  Found this photo on the web today and it brought back memories of striving to improve as a competitive paddler.  John Wood (pictured above) raced to an exhilarating silver medal in the Men’s C1 (canoeing) at the Montreal Olympics.  

Not only was he racing in the days when competitors from the Soviet bloc were systematically doping, he also lost the 1976 Olympic 500m race by about 5cm.  This was a Games where Canada notoriously won multiple silvers and bronzes, but failed to win a single gold.  

Wood’s race on a level playing field would have been a gold medal result.  It remains one of the heartbreaks of the Canadian Olympic movement.  The greatest canoeist of his generation.

David Byrne, Gregor Robertson to Talk Bicycles

Posted on Updated on

This I want to see.  Byrne has been a bicycle activist in NYC for some time.  He’s also not a bad lead singer.

—–

From The Tyee

On Oct. 24, David Byrne will host Cities, Bicycles, and the Future of Getting Around. It’s a new take on Talking Heads: a lecture series that brings the Grammy/Oscar/Golden Globe winner together with a civic leader, an urban theorist and a bike advocate to discuss how to make Vancouver more bike-friendly.

The Tyee is the media sponsor for when Byrne fastens his u-lock to a Vancouver rack for this event, part of Capilano University’s Pacific Arbour Speaker series. Our team will be there with our helmets firmly fastened, ready to take part in this one-of-a-kind discussion.

RBC GranFondo Whistler Bike Ride

Posted on Updated on

grandfondo_2090, originally uploaded by Dustan Sept.

Some outstanding photos here of the RBC GranFondo Whistler bike race this past weekend by Dustan Sept.

Here’s some coverage:

They came, they cycled, and most of them got here in the inaugural RBC GranFondo Whistler bike ride.

The event, which featured 4,000 keen cyclists pedalling the 120 kilo-metres from downtown Vancouver to Whistler mostly on a dedicated lane on the Sea to Sky highway, went off with few hitches on Saturday.

“We’re very proud of what we accomplished, proud of all the 4,000 riders and the 600 crew and volunteers who made it happen,” said RBC GranFondo Whistler cofounder Kevin Thomson.

A serious crash occurred early in the ride on the Upper Levels highway in West Vancouver, however. A male rider was rushed to Lions Gate Hospital under emergency conditions. Thomson said he was still waiting for details on the accident, and added that all aspects of the event would be reviewed over the next few weeks.

In light of the enthusiastic response to the event, which is modelled after mass rides of the same name held in some parts of Europe for decades, the plan is to increase the race to 6,000 next year and 10,000 in 2012. A Gran Fondo is also planned for the Okanagan next summer. The results and complete times of finishers was to be available on the event’s website ( http://www.rbcgranfondowhistler.com)at midnight Saturday.

Read more here.

UBC E-BEETLE FIRST ELECTRIC CAR TO CROSS CANADA

Posted on Updated on

History made in an E-Beetle.

This is an amazing accomplishment!  6,400 km in 16 days, showing the durability of electric-powered cars.  If you want to follow their whole journey in retrospect, here’s the UBC Electric Car Club’s E-Beetle blog.  And here’s their video:

From their site:

At 6:00 PM AST, the UBC Electric Car Club’s E-Beetle arrives at ALDERNY LANDING, DARTMOUTH NS and is the first-ever electric car  to complete a coast to coast voyage across Canada. Starting on August 21st, 2010, the E- Beetle has covered 6400 kilometers in 16 days (2 days break in Quebec

waiting for Hurricane Earl to pass) without any support vehicles, using only existing infrastructure.

The E-Beetle’s voyage has been featured on Wired.com, CTV, CBC, and in print media across Canada. The public is able to track the E-Beetle’s arrival by GPS via the UBCECC website.

The E-Beetle is powered by a Lithium Iron Phosphate battery pack with a capacity of 50 Kilowatt Hours, giving it a range of 300km at 100km/h and 500km at 50km/h with a top speed of 140kmh. Charging time is approximately 4 hours.

Tear the Curtain!

Posted on Updated on

From the Arts Club release:

Glamour! Intrigue! Suspense! A collaboration with the innovative Electric Company Theatre, the premiere of this stylish thriller is inspired by the “reel” history of the Stanley Theatre. Experience a multimedia spectacle featuring your favourite Hollywood film noir archetypes: the mob boss, the femme fatale, the hardboiled detective, and his girl Friday. Does the truth lie somewhere between the stage and the screen?

Photo: Brian Johnson

Trailer from long-awaited “Tear the Curtain”

Posted on Updated on

This is a must see.  World premiere of the Electric Company Theatre’s “Tear the Curtain” at the Stanley Theatre.  It opens September 9.