living

Vancouver’s Neon Neighbourhoods

Image Posted on Updated on

ovaltineHaven’t been here in a long time and I thought I’d open up again on the blog to show some of the things I’ve seen and done lately. Almost a year ago now I co-curated an online exhibit with the Virtual Museum of Canada and the Museum of Vancouver about Vancouver’s neon history. The exhibit is called The Visible City and I highly recommend it for the stories and the images, told and captured by some of Vancouver’s finest including Dal Richards, Joe “Sh*thead” Keithley (DOA), Gregory Henriquez (architect of the new Woodwards complex), Mark Brand (Save On Meats), and Bill Pechet (Great White Way on Granville Corridor) .

This post links you to many of the photos I took for the exhibit, which I’ve featured here in my Neon Neighbourhoods set on flickr. Enjoy!

25th anniversary of the Haida blockade

Posted on Updated on

Excellent article in the Tyee today, looking back at the turn of forestry practices and the return of culture in this province.

We Gathered to Say Haw’aa

Celebrating, 25 years later, the Haida blockade that helped win a crucial fight to save forests.

By Caitlyn Vernon, Today, TheTyee.ca

Think back 25 years. Picture the way forestry used to happen along the coast of British Columbia. I remember driving past clear cuts that stretched from river bottom to mountain top, hillsides looking completely shaved of all life. Massive piles of log debris obstructing streams, preventing salmon from spawning. With increasing speed, the ancient trees that had taken thousands of years to grow were being mowed down for timber and toilet paper.

But not everyone was just standing by. On Meares Island off the west coast of Vancouver Island, the First Nations joined forces with environmentalists to stop logging. And on Haida Gwaii a campaign had been in the works since the early 1970s to protect the southern part of the archipelago. It was called the South Moresby wilderness proposal.

As a kid in the early ’80s I had the poster of Burnaby Narrows on my wall. It seemed this iconic image from South Moresby was everywhere at the time — the bright sea stars and abundance of rich intertidal life illustrating the beauty of the area and raising awareness of the need to protect it from logging.

Read the entire article here.

Song Dong’s mother lode: Beijing artist turns mom’s hoardings into art

Posted on Updated on

What a sight: The second storey of the Vancouver Art Gallery, usually stark and pristine with priceless works of art, is filled with stuff. It would not be unfair to call the items, spread out on the floor across three large rooms, junk. But these things – pop bottles, cans of Raid, bits of outdoor carpeting, socks – were a treasure to one woman, and as such have travelled to art galleries around the world in a monumental installation called Waste Not.

This installation is the work of Song Dong, a noted Beijing-based conceptual artist. Consisting of more than 10,000 items, as well as the frame of the tiny house where he grew up, Waste Not serves as a memorial to his father, Song Shiping, and a tribute to his mother, Zhao Xiangyuan. There are strong echoes here of both the Cultural Revolution and of China’s new consumer culture. And there’s an environmental message too: Nothing in Zhao’s life was thrown out, or went to waste.

Full article here at the Globe and Mail.

David Byrne, Gregor Robertson to Talk Bicycles

Posted on Updated on

This I want to see.  Byrne has been a bicycle activist in NYC for some time.  He’s also not a bad lead singer.

—–

From The Tyee

On Oct. 24, David Byrne will host Cities, Bicycles, and the Future of Getting Around. It’s a new take on Talking Heads: a lecture series that brings the Grammy/Oscar/Golden Globe winner together with a civic leader, an urban theorist and a bike advocate to discuss how to make Vancouver more bike-friendly.

The Tyee is the media sponsor for when Byrne fastens his u-lock to a Vancouver rack for this event, part of Capilano University’s Pacific Arbour Speaker series. Our team will be there with our helmets firmly fastened, ready to take part in this one-of-a-kind discussion.

UBC E-BEETLE FIRST ELECTRIC CAR TO CROSS CANADA

Posted on Updated on

History made in an E-Beetle.

This is an amazing accomplishment!  6,400 km in 16 days, showing the durability of electric-powered cars.  If you want to follow their whole journey in retrospect, here’s the UBC Electric Car Club’s E-Beetle blog.  And here’s their video:

From their site:

At 6:00 PM AST, the UBC Electric Car Club’s E-Beetle arrives at ALDERNY LANDING, DARTMOUTH NS and is the first-ever electric car  to complete a coast to coast voyage across Canada. Starting on August 21st, 2010, the E- Beetle has covered 6400 kilometers in 16 days (2 days break in Quebec

waiting for Hurricane Earl to pass) without any support vehicles, using only existing infrastructure.

The E-Beetle’s voyage has been featured on Wired.com, CTV, CBC, and in print media across Canada. The public is able to track the E-Beetle’s arrival by GPS via the UBCECC website.

The E-Beetle is powered by a Lithium Iron Phosphate battery pack with a capacity of 50 Kilowatt Hours, giving it a range of 300km at 100km/h and 500km at 50km/h with a top speed of 140kmh. Charging time is approximately 4 hours.

VAG public forum tonight @ 7pm

Posted on Updated on

Vancouver Art Gallery, originally uploaded by Duane Storey.

There is a public forum tonight @ 7pm at Robson Square regarding the proposed relocation of the Vancouver Art Gallery.

Good background here on miss604.com.

Vancouver 2010 Sun Run

Posted on Updated on

Huge crowds running past our door today for the Vancouver 2010 Sun Run. Apparently 51,397 registered for the event this year. My daughter ran it for the first time without training, with teammates from her Ultimate league, and finished in 19,852nd place and finished in 1:10:29. And that’s exactly the beauty of the Sun Run. I loved seeing how many took strollers or walked just to take part.




, originally uploaded by inklake.

VANCOUVER – Waves upon waves of runners poured down West Georgia Street during the 2010 Vancouver Sun Run.

Kenyan-born Kip Kangogo of Lethbridge, AB won the 2010 Vancouver Sun Run with a time of 29:02. The winner of the women’s division is Malindi Elmore of Kelowna with a time of 33:06.

The top Canadian-born runner is Eric Gillis of Guelph, ON with a time of 29:05, putting him in second place overall – just three seconds behind the champion Kangogo.

Before the run started, inside the Sun Run headquarters at the Hyatt Regency hotel, the Vancouver Sun’s vice-president of promotions, Jamie Pitblado, addressed a breakfast audience of media and race VIPs.

Aside from wishing all in attendance a Happy Mother’s Day, Pitblado announced the total registration for today’s Sun Run at 51,397 participants.

Read more here.