Latest Event Updates

Vertigo

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Ski season is back and the north shore mountains here in Vancouver are beckoning.

Came across this photo online this afternoon. It was taken by Paul Bednar, a ski instructor from the Skischule I taught with in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.  I still remember the rush of fear and adrenalin I got as I looked over this cliff myself years ago.  Believe me, when I did it, I did not hang my ski tips over the cliff face.

Here’s the note he posted with the photo:

There was a t-bar at the top of the Zugspitze (elevation 2962m/9718 ft). Once you got off the lift, you could sidestep up another 50 metres or so to a small break in the rocks that formed the border between Germany and Austria. At that point, you could just stand there with your skis still on and look down the cliff face onto the town of Lermoos, Austria.

In other words, one slip and you’re in Austria, almost 3,000m below.

Note the very old-school Völkl’s.

25th anniversary of the Haida blockade

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Excellent article in the Tyee today, looking back at the turn of forestry practices and the return of culture in this province.

We Gathered to Say Haw’aa

Celebrating, 25 years later, the Haida blockade that helped win a crucial fight to save forests.

By Caitlyn Vernon, Today, TheTyee.ca

Think back 25 years. Picture the way forestry used to happen along the coast of British Columbia. I remember driving past clear cuts that stretched from river bottom to mountain top, hillsides looking completely shaved of all life. Massive piles of log debris obstructing streams, preventing salmon from spawning. With increasing speed, the ancient trees that had taken thousands of years to grow were being mowed down for timber and toilet paper.

But not everyone was just standing by. On Meares Island off the west coast of Vancouver Island, the First Nations joined forces with environmentalists to stop logging. And on Haida Gwaii a campaign had been in the works since the early 1970s to protect the southern part of the archipelago. It was called the South Moresby wilderness proposal.

As a kid in the early ’80s I had the poster of Burnaby Narrows on my wall. It seemed this iconic image from South Moresby was everywhere at the time — the bright sea stars and abundance of rich intertidal life illustrating the beauty of the area and raising awareness of the need to protect it from logging.

Read the entire article here.

Freeriding

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Take a look at this freeriding video produced for network television a few years ago.  Just dug it out of the archives.  I had the good fortune to work with Jay Hoots and several other experts and coaches to create this feature about injuries and how to avoid them.  One of the most spectacular and dangerous sports around.  Some really accomplished riders in this piece.

Congrats to World Champions Jennerich and Cameron!

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Belated congratulations to Lindsay Jennerich and Tracy Cameron on a brilliant row at the World Championships in New Zealand.  We finally got to see the race yesterday on CBC Television.  Amazing determination to fight through brutally difficult course conditions.  The final 100 metres of the race showed the kind of character and stamina this crew has.  Extremely impressive victory.

Tracy Cameron of Shubenacadie, N.S., and Victoria’s Lindsay Jennerich won Canada’s second gold medal at the world rowing championships with a victory in the lightweight women’s double sculls event Friday in New Zealand.

Cameron and Jennerich finished the 2,000-metre course in a time of eight minutes 6.20 seconds. Daniela Reimer and Anja Noske of Germany won silver in 8:07.33 and Christina Giazitzidou and Alexandra Tsiavou of Greece took bronze in 8:09.14.

Canada also won gold Wednesday in the adaptive coxed four.

Also Friday, Jensen of Innerkip, Ont. and Rares Crisan of Mississauga Ont., won bronze in the men’s light pair.

Cameron and Jennerich overcame windy conditions to win Canada’s first world championship gold in the lightweight women’s double sculls since the 1990s.

“We did an excellent job of handling the head- and cross-wind conditions,” Jennerich said.

“We just kept to the race plan — to stay long and keep breathing. … What I thought was really positive was that at 750 (metres) to go we had a lead and we were at a low enough rate, with a good enough rhythm, that I knew if someone was going to challenge us that we would be able to answer.”

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/sports/amateur/story/2010/11/05/sp-rowing.html#ixzz15HoaXdu8

Vancouver Opera gives Lillian Alling world premiere

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If you’re thinking about heading out for a walk this weekend, you’re probably planning on a few hours, tops – and likely on pavement, or at very least a well-worn path.

But when Russian émigré Lillian Alling went for a walk in the 1920s, she strode clear across North America – through dense bush and over steep mountain passes – with nothing but the clothes on her back and an iron pipe for protection on her way from New York to British Columbia, then north to the Yukon.

Complete article here.

Stunning commitment to original work from the Vancouver Opera.  Here is another example of their innovation.

Song Dong’s mother lode: Beijing artist turns mom’s hoardings into art

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What a sight: The second storey of the Vancouver Art Gallery, usually stark and pristine with priceless works of art, is filled with stuff. It would not be unfair to call the items, spread out on the floor across three large rooms, junk. But these things – pop bottles, cans of Raid, bits of outdoor carpeting, socks – were a treasure to one woman, and as such have travelled to art galleries around the world in a monumental installation called Waste Not.

This installation is the work of Song Dong, a noted Beijing-based conceptual artist. Consisting of more than 10,000 items, as well as the frame of the tiny house where he grew up, Waste Not serves as a memorial to his father, Song Shiping, and a tribute to his mother, Zhao Xiangyuan. There are strong echoes here of both the Cultural Revolution and of China’s new consumer culture. And there’s an environmental message too: Nothing in Zhao’s life was thrown out, or went to waste.

Full article here at the Globe and Mail.

‘Good Morning to the World’ wins 17th Dragons and Tigers Award at VIFF

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Japan’s Good Morning to the World has won the Vancouver International Film Festival’s 17th annual Dragons and Tigers Award. The drama by 23-year-old filmmaker Hirohara Satoru edged out seven other films from Vietnam, South Korea, Thailand, China and Singapore to win the award, which is given to young filmmakers from Asia.

Special mentions were given to the features Don’t Be Afraid, Bi!, directed by Phan Dang Di from Vietnam, and Rumination, directed by Xu Ruotao from China.

Good Morning to the World will receive an additional screening on Saturday at 1 p.m. at Pacific Cinematheque. Satoru takes home a $10,000 cash prize along with the award.

Read more here.