sport

Beach Running, PEI

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Pictured below are kids from the Spartan Track Club, coached by 1998 gold medalist Dave MacEachern in PEI. Last summer during the Beijing Games I travelled with Catriona Le May Doan to profile the community behind Jared Connaughton for CBC Sports.

Spartan Track club runs Covehead dunes
Spartan Track club runs Covehead dunes

A big part of our story was how Beijing 200m semi-finalist Connaughton had trained without any real track facilities by working out on north shore beaches, school hallways, and ancient cinder tracks, yet had still managed to make the elite level of Olympic competition.

The two little guys – front and back – are MacEachern’s youngest.

Catriona on camera at Covehead Beach in our PEI shoot

Catriona interviewing Jared Connaughton's parents

Charlottetown’s Connaughton prepares for Bolt in Toronto

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Here’s an article about fast up-and-coming Jared Connaughton, a Canadian Olympic sprinter we profiled last summer during the Beijing Olympics.

Beijing Olympics Athletics Mens 200m

Connaughton in his ready-to-run phase

CHARLES REID
The Guardian

Olympic sprint star Usain Bolt of Jamaica is the focus to today’s Festival of Excellence in Toronto, but Jared Connaughton of New Haven, P.E.I., understands it goes with the territory.

“It’s been pretty hectic, the media attention and hype around Bolt. I’m in the phase where I’m ready to run,” Connaughton, who will race against Bolt in the 100 metres, told The Guardian from Toronto on Wednesday. “This is by far the biggest festival in Canada (as far as media goes). It’s the big thing in town. We kind of caught up in all of this, but it’s part of the package.”

Running, however, is Connaughton’s main focus.

An appearance in the 200-metre sprint semifinals at the Beijing Olympics last August bolted him to national prominence and Connaughton, who ran a Canadian-high 10.15 in the 100 last year, knows a good race tonight keeps that profile up.

Guardian

Mallorie Nicholson

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Mallorie has to be regarded as one of the world’s best female sprint canoeists. She is the Canadian champion at every distance she competes in, but has virtually no international circuit to test herself against. If she did compete internationally on a regular basis, we’d be looking at the career of a World Champion.

She won the Junior and Senior C1 (Canadian 1) titles at all distances — 200, 500 & 1,000m — at last summer’s Canadian championships in Dartmouth.

She helped us out in our CBC profile of the Burloak Canoe and Kayak Club for the Beijing Summer Olympics.